History

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East Monkton Church:  A Historical Perspective


The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized in 1797 by Joseph Mitchell, the first pastor.  There being no convenient center in the town, the society has three different places of worship: at the church in East Monkton, the town house at Monkton Ridge, and the church in Barnumtown, one service being held at each place on alternate Sabbaths, served by one pastor, Rev. Delano Perry.  The building at East Monkton, erected in 1867, will accommodate two hundred and fifty persons, cost $2,000 and is now valued, including grounds, at $2,500.  The society is at present in a prosperous state, with many members.


Construction of the East Monkton Church began on August 27, 1866.  Member families contributed the needed finances for the cost of the building project.  Carpenters boarded with George and Evaline Morgan, who turned the board money ($1.00 per meal) back into the building fund.  The pulpit was built about two stairs higher than the organ level.


The land, upon which the East Monkton Church stands, was deeded from John A. Beers on February 8, 1867.  The deed grants “ministers of all Christian denominations in the United States the privilege of preaching in the house”, and specified that, “Funerals shall have precedence of all other meetings.”


The church was dedicated on February 21, 1867, during which a double wedding ceremony took place.  The church was completed free of debt because the Methodist Book of Discipline has always required all indebtedness be removed from a church building before dedication.


During the early 1900’s, several pews were removed and the wall moved further back to enlarge the foyer.  A dining area was added in the old chair loft, where dinners were served.


The church ceased to be an appointment of the Methodists in 1937.  However, the Friends Methodist Church, whose congregation met at the Quaker Meeting House on Monkton Ridge, held summer services for several years after.


The church sustained damage during the windstorm in November of 1950.  Wind damage insurance was carried so the full coverage of $2,300. was allowed for damages.


A centennial service was held at the East Monkton Church (called Morgan Church at the time) in 1966, but little is known about the actual event.  During the time of the 1976 centennial, interest evolved in restoring this historic landmark.  Community members added a new roof, a cross on the top, repainted the interior and exterior, added cement steps with iron railing, yard lights and ceiling fans.


Interest continued to wax and wane over the years until 2003 when the East Monkton Church Association was formed.  At that time, the Friends Methodist Church began to hold worship services at the East Monkton Church during one month in the summer.


Time line

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Historical Perspectives

1700’s

1797 – The Methodist Episcopal Church was organized by Joseph Mitchell

1800’s

There was no convenient center in the town, so the society had three different places of workshop:  at the church in East Monkton, the town house at Monkton Ridge, and the church in Barnumtown.  One service, served by one pastor, was held at each place on alternate Sabbaths.

1867 – The land, upon which the East Monkton Church stands, was deeded from John A. Beers on February 8th.  The deed grants “ministers of all Christian denominations in the United States the privilege of preaching in the house”, and specified that, “Funerals shall have precedence of all other meetings.”

1866 – Construction began on August 27th.  Member families contributed the needed finances for the cost of the building project.  Carpenters boarded with George and Evaline Morgan, who turned the board money ($1.00 per meal) back into the building fund.  The pulpit was built about two stairs higher than the organ level.  The building was able to accommodate two hundred and fifty people, and cost $2,000.

1867 –The church was dedicated on February 21st.  A double wedding ceremony took place during the dedication service.  The church was completed free of debt because the Methodist Book of Discipline has always required all indebtedness be removed from a church building before dedication.

1900’s

Several seats were removed, and the wall moved further back to enlarge the entry. A dining area was added in the old chair loft, where many dinners were served.

1937 – The church ceased to be an appointment of the Methodists in 1937.  The Friend Methodist Church held summer services for several years after.

1950 – The church sustained great damage during the windstorm in November.  Wind damage insurance was carried, so the insurance company allowed the full coverage of $2,300. For damages.

1966 – A centennial service was held at the Morgan Church (the former name).

1976 – During the centennial time, interest evolved in restoring this landmark.  Community member added a new roof, a cross on the top, repainted the interior and exterior, added cement steps with iron railing, yard lights and ceiling fans.